Peter Attia What if we’re wrong about diabetes?


As a young ER doctor, Peter Attia felt contempt for a patient with diabetes. She was overweight, he thought, and thus responsible for the fact that she needed a foot amputation. But years later, Attia received an unpleasant medical surprise that led him to wonder: is our understanding of diabetes right? Could the precursors to diabetes cause obesity, and not the other way around? A look at how assumptions may be leading us to wage the wrong medical war.

Type 2 Diabetes – Which Exercise Method Is Best for Weight Loss?

Managing or reversing the effects of Type 2 diabetes means more than getting your blood sugar under control. It also means regaining your health as much as you possibly can, and safeguarding it. You may be wondering which particular method of exercise is best for you as you look to regain your health: cardio or weight training. When it comes to weight loss, it is worth considering their differences. While cardio and resistance training are both forms of physical activity, they accomplish different things.

The Growing Diabetes Epidemic

Diabetes kills more than people around the world than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. The disease is expected to become one of the top five causes of death globally by 2030. Here are the alarming facts.

Type 2 Diabetes – You Can Make Diabetes a Thing of the Past

Regardless of your age, ethnic background, or medical history, if you have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes you share one thing in common with all people diagnosed with this disease. You have a high and unstable blood sugar condition. Other similarities worth mentioning may include weight problems, poor food choices, and a lack of physical activity. But the similarities stop there. Each person reacts differently to his or her condition.

Type 2 Diabetes – Blood Sugar Control and Pain As The Result of A Stroke

Scientists at Seonam University College of Medicine in Jeonju, Korea found a link between HbA1c readings and the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in two hundred people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and who had stroked or had a cerebrovascular accident (CVA). This particular study was published in the October 2016 copy of the journal Annals of Rehabilitative Medicine. The study divided the diabetic participants into those with and without CRPS. The participants with CRPS averaged significantly higher HbA1c levels than those with lower CRPS values. Then they classified the participants further.

Type 2 Diabetes – Are Diabetes and Obesity Linked With Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a bone condition in which calcium and other minerals are depleted from the skeleton, causing brittleness of the bones. Women face more risk of osteoporosis because they lose certain hormones as they age, which contributes to bone loss. Type 2 diabetes accelerates bone loss in women and, to a lesser extent, in men. Weight-bearing exercises can help minimize bone loss. The bones lose density and strength, which along with slowed reactions and poor eyesight, can lead to bone fractures in older women. The International Osteoporosis Foundation estimates osteoporosis affects 200 million women and is responsible for over 8.9 million fractures each year worldwide.

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