Insulin Resistance | Are Artificial Sweeteners Safe?


Insulin Resistance: You might be wondering, are artificial sweeteners safe? Today I’ll break down everything you need to know about artificial sweeteners and your health.


This video is not designed to and does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment or services to you or to any other individual. Through my videos, blog posts, website information, I give suggestions for you and your doctor to research and provide general information for educational purposes only. The information provided in this video or site, or through linkages to other sites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call consultation or the advice of your physician or other healthcare provider. Genesis Health Products and Deborah Maragopoulos FNP are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or product you obtain through this video or site.
All images and additional video segments contained in the Thumbnails and/or B-roll segments are used in strict compliance with the appropriate permissions and licenses required from https://pixabay.com and/or https://stock.adobe.com and in accordance with the YouTube Partner Program, Community guidelines & YouTube terms of service

Type 2 Diabetes – Is Luck a Factor in the Development of Diabetes?

Do you believe in luck? Some people believe most outcomes are the product of particular actions. Otherwise, it is a coincidence. Whereas others believe there is such a thing as luck – regardless of our doings, we may have good and bad things happen to us. Taken to a greater extent, some will believe we tend to be lucky or unlucky as a result. When it comes to health whether luck is involved or not, is often a hot topic for many people. Since it is an area vital for many of us, it will naturally raise the question of just how much influence we have on our well-being. Let us focus on this idea in regards to Type 2 diabetes since it is currently one of the most prevalent problems for middle-aged adults.

Type 2 Diabetes – High Blood Fats and Obesity Increases Your Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

Hypertriglyceridemic waist (HW) is defined as a waist size over 90 centimeters in men or over 85 centimeters in women, along with high blood fats. In October of 2017, the journal Cardiorenal Medicine reported on a study in which hypertriglyceridemic waist was linked with a high risk for developing kidney disease in people who have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Investigators at the First Hospital of Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao, China, looked at 538 people with Type 2 diabetes. A total of 34.9 percent had HW. Early kidney disease was found in 10.6 percent of the participants with a regular waist measurement and blood fats, compared with 24.5 percent of those participants with hypertriglyceridemic waist.

How Diabetes Can Damage Your Kidneys (and What You Can Do About It)

Your kidneys contain millions of minute blood vessels that filter waste products from your blood. But diabetes can damage these amazing organs, so they lose their filtering ability. How is kidney disease caused and what can you do to prevent or reverse the damage?

Type 2 Diabetes and Weight Loss – Focus on “Good” Calories to Control Your Blood Sugar and Weight

There is such a thing as “good” calories versus “bad” calories. Calories are not created equal – even if a calorie is a calorie, the source they come from provokes different effects. No one can argue calories from a can of soda have the same net effect as calories from a natural fruit juice. It just would not make sense. From a weight loss perspective, it is essential to consider your caloric intake. In this sense, it is vital to manage your input whether it is “good” or “bad” calories. But even then, you ought to focus on the right kind, because it makes a difference.

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating – Do Your Eating Habits Change With the Seasons?

Changing seasons bring about apparent change. Sometimes it is quick, other times it is gradual, but it never fails to be noticeable. If you live in an area that goes through all four traditional seasons, the effect is even more pronounced. If you do not have a typical winter, odds are you live in an environment that ranges from warm to cool, at the very least at different times of the year. What you may not notice, however, is how your eating habits change according to the season – this is harder to recognize. The move might be subtle, and you could be likely unaware of the differences in your appetite.

You May Also Like